Security Guard

Skills

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  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

  • Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

  • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

  • Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work-related documents.

  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

  • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Knowledge

  • Public Safety and Security — Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

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Ability

  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

  • Far Vision — The ability to see details at a distance.

  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.

  • Selective Attention — The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.

  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.

  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.

  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.

  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.

  • The flexibility of Closure — The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material.

  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).

  • Perceptual Speed — The ability to quickly and accurately compare similarities and differences among sets of letters, numbers, objects, pictures, or patterns. The things to be compared may be presented at the same time or one after the other. This ability also includes comparing a presented object with a remembered object.

Education

  • Percentage of RespondentsEducation Level Required

  • High school diploma or equivalent 

  • Some college, no degree

  • Post-secondary certificate